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Reservoiir Fire @ Hwy39 Morris Dam

 
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 20, 2016 12:18 pm    Post subject: Reservoiir Fire @ Hwy39 Morris Dam  Reply with quote

100+ acres in less than 1 hour.

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 20, 2016 5:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fish Canyon is burning too. At this time the western boundary is Van Tassel Truck Trail. The 'eastern' side of Mt. Bliss is now brush free! Looks like Silver Fish Road 1N29 and Stone Cabin Flat will be next to get cleared.
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 20, 2016 5:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

yup...that secondary fire is headed to Monrovia Peak...any chance of stopping it there looks grim for overnight. I havent seen any updates on the original fire other than Silver Mountain looks to be burned.

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 20, 2016 5:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've not heard of anyone getting to Stone Cabin Flat in recent history. That might change now. White Saddle might be Off-white/Gray saddle soon. I hope they stop it from going north of Rincon Red Box Road (Monrovia-to-Pine Ridge) and west into Sawpit Canyon.
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 20, 2016 5:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Modis map from 2pm today
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 20, 2016 6:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

HikeUp wrote:
I've not heard of anyone getting to Stone Cabin Flat in recent history.


http://centerlinerule.blogspot.co...awpit-and-silverfish-machete.html
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 20, 2016 7:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nice link. Sounds like the hell I have read about!. Too bad about any old stand trees that'll be toast. Hope the fire bypasses any protected groves.
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Location: Stuntin in the trap son

PostPosted: Tue Jun 21, 2016 7:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Reckon the Bald Eagle nest is mighty close to being burned?
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 21, 2016 9:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

6/21 7:30 am
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 21, 2016 5:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Looks like excellent progress on the fire has kept it contained...this guy wanted no part of it though

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 22, 2016 9:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This deer got itself trapped inside Royal Oaks Elementary School in Duarte after fleeing the fire.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 22, 2016 11:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here is an enhanced Google map centered on the Fish fire and Reservoir fire near Los Angeles.  Those two fires might burn together and have been renamed the San Gabriel Complex fire.

This map has a number of GIS overlay layers that can be turned on/off.  Each time you open the map the most recent data hosted on the GIS servers is displayed.

https://mappingsupport.com/p/gmap...d_map/USA/USA_wildland_fire_3.txt

The ‘top' layer is clickable and will display all the GIS attribute data for the thing that you clicked.  When you open the map the ‘Fire perimeter’ layer is on top.  If the GIS server does not respond it is likely swamped with requests for data.

To see high resolution topo maps, change the basemap to “CalTopo Hi-res”.  You might have to zoom in.  

For tips on using the map please click "About this map" in the upper left corner.  

I am the developer of Gmap4 which is an enhanced Google map viewer that is displaying the map.

Joseph
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 22, 2016 5:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Taco wrote:
Reckon the Bald Eagle nest is mighty close to being burned?


http://www.latimes.com/local/lano...re-eagle-20160622-snap-story.html

"...Firefighters battling a pair of wildfires in the San Gabriel Mountains have been instructed to avoid a 1,000-foot radius area around a nest where a baby eagle is getting ready to fledge, a U.S. Forest Service official said Wednesday.

The bald eagle’s nest is not located in part of the forest where the Reservoir and Fish fires are burning. The buffer zone above and around the nest is intended for water-dumping helicopters, which create noise and air turbulence that could disturb the chick, said Ann Berkley, a wildlife biologist with the Forest Service...."
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 22, 2016 5:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jelf wrote:
Here is an enhanced Google map centered on the Fish fire and Reservoir fire near Los Angeles.  Those two fires might burn together and have been renamed the San Gabriel Complex fire.

This map has a number of GIS overlay layers that can be turned on/off.  Each time you open the map the most recent data hosted on the GIS servers is displayed.

https://mappingsupport.com/p/gmap...d_map/USA/USA_wildland_fire_3.txt

The ‘top' layer is clickable and will display all the GIS attribute data for the thing that you clicked.  When you open the map the ‘Fire perimeter’ layer is on top.  If the GIS server does not respond it is likely swamped with requests for data.

To see high resolution topo maps, change the basemap to “CalTopo Hi-res”.  You might have to zoom in.  

For tips on using the map please click "About this map" in the upper left corner.  

I am the developer of Gmap4 which is an enhanced Google map viewer that is displaying the map.

Joseph


Cool...thanks.
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SageUrsus



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PostPosted: Wed Jun 22, 2016 8:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Don't even think about it.

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PostPosted: Sat Jun 25, 2016 7:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

So is highway 39 closed as a result of this fire? This would make sense, but the caltrans site claims that it's open:

http://www.dot.ca.gov/cgi-bin/roa...i?roadnumber=39&submit=Search
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 08, 2016 3:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

2 deaths from fire
http://www.latimes.com/local/lano...urn-area-20160707-snap-story.html

"...The man who says he found the charred remains of his brother and cousin in a fire-scorched area of the Angeles National Forest has criticized authorities for failing to help search for the pair after they went missing more than two weeks ago.

Richard Pardo told KCBS-TV he was searching trails for weeks in the burn zone of the San Gabriel Complex fire, near where he had dropped off his 16-year-old brother, Jonathan Pardo, and his 31-year-old cousin, Carlos Perez, last month for a hike. Then on Thursday, he and family members found their charred bodies at the top of a mountain.

Pardo said the fires near Azusa and Duarte erupted just hours after he had left them, so he raced back to get them. But he told the news station he couldn’t find them and the roads were closed.

Pardo told The Times that law enforcement didn’t want to help search for his missing family members......

Sheriff’s Lt. Mike Rosson said that Azusa Police were notified of the missing hikers on June 23, three days after the fire erupted, and that a missing person’s report was filed that same day.

The police department also conducted an “emergency ping” of the 16-year-old boy’s cell phone, Rosson said. The last signal available for the the phone was June 20 -- the first day of the fire -- and that its location appeared to be in a residential area around Azusa and Irwindale. Rosson said the Azusa Police Department also notified the fire’s unified command to be on the lookout for the missing men...."

Another source: "Lt. Mike Rosson of the Sheriff's Department homicide bureau said Pardo's family first reported two hikers missing on June 25. Rosson said search missions in the canyon area can be "futile."
"It's hundreds of thousands of acres," he said."

And yet another source : "The LASD says the department did all it could to help find the missing hikers but it was too dangerous during the fire. They say, once the flames were out, they did send out search and rescue teams."
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 08, 2016 6:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another example of someone expecting the government to bail them out when they get into trouble.  Venturing into wild areas can be potentially dangerous.  Things can go wrong in the back country and you can't just dial 911 and expect an ambulance to pull up and rush you to the hospital.  You either have to avoid potentially dangerous activities or you have to accept responsibility for your own actions if you get into trouble.  There are no guarantees.  In Southern California there is always the threat of wildfire and getting trapped is a real possibility.
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 11, 2016 7:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Huff and Puff wrote:
Another example of someone expecting the government to bail them out when they get into trouble.  Venturing into wild areas can be potentially dangerous.  Things can go wrong in the back country and you can't just dial 911 and expect an ambulance to pull up and rush you to the hospital.  You either have to avoid potentially dangerous activities or you have to accept responsibility for your own actions if you get into trouble.  There are no guarantees.  In Southern California there is always the threat of wildfire and getting trapped is a real possibility.


In reading that article I was unable to locate anything that suggested anybody had expected anything of anybody, government or otherwise. That being said, any person who did not attempt to use whatever resources they could in a life-threatening situation is just an idiot. If the "government" is there, use it. That's not a guarantee, but that's no reason to refuse to seek assistance.
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 11, 2016 2:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

SGBob wrote:
Huff and Puff wrote:
Another example of someone expecting the government to bail them out when they get into trouble.  Venturing into wild areas can be potentially dangerous.  Things can go wrong in the back country and you can't just dial 911 and expect an ambulance to pull up and rush you to the hospital.  You either have to avoid potentially dangerous activities or you have to accept responsibility for your own actions if you get into trouble.  There are no guarantees.  In Southern California there is always the threat of wildfire and getting trapped is a real possibility.


In reading that article I was unable to locate anything that suggested anybody had expected anything of anybody, government or otherwise. That being said, any person who did not attempt to use whatever resources they could in a life-threatening situation is just an idiot. If the "government" is there, use it. That's not a guarantee, but that's no reason to refuse to seek assistance.


I don't think that we were reading the same article.  

"Jonathan’s brother, Ricardo Pardo, faulted authorities for not doing more to help locate the pair."

Many people think that the government is some omnificent paternal entity that is responsible for their protection and are disappointed when that is not the case.  In the backcountry cell phone reception is frequently nonexistent and help may be a long ways away.  

We all know about people who venture into wild areas who are unprepared or engage in activities that are beyond their skill levels.  Sometimes they are rescued, and other times their bodies are recovered by the "authorities".  The bottom line is everyone should take responsibility for their own actions and not assume that the "authorities" are responsible for bailing them out of a difficult or life-threatening situation.  When the "authorities" do take on a nanny-state, paternalistic attitude regarding wildlands this leads to closures, permits and restricted activities.
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 11, 2016 6:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Huff and Puff wrote:

"Jonathan’s brother, Ricardo Pardo, faulted authorities for not doing more to help locate the pair."


That should have been prevented by setting the expectations of the family.From their perspective, the family doesnt know the status of the search for the 2. Its irregular that someone doesnt tell them how the process is going to go.According to the govt standpoint, they were looking for them after the fire....but the family seems not to know that at newspaper interview time. Maybe at this point, they dont believe it anyway.

Had the sentence said "save the pair", then that would be silly sentiment...agreed. I think the 2 were at 100% chance of death...if thats because they were ascending out of Islip canyon or whatever. They were found in brush and not easily found at that. But at the same time, I do feel for a family wondering whats happening.
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 11, 2016 11:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Huff and Puff wrote:
Many people think that the government is some omnificent paternal entity that is responsible for their protection and are disappointed when that is not the case.  In the backcountry cell phone reception is frequently nonexistent and help may be a long ways away.  

We all know about people who venture into wild areas who are unprepared or engage in activities that are beyond their skill levels.  Sometimes they are rescued, and other times their bodies are recovered by the "authorities".  The bottom line is everyone should take responsibility for their own actions and not assume that the "authorities" are responsible for bailing them out of a difficult or life-threatening situation.  When the "authorities" do take on a nanny-state, paternalistic attitude regarding wildlands this leads to closures, permits and restricted activities.


Are firefighters and the police required to save you from every problem life throws your way? No, but they do have a responsibility to rescue individuals in danger, be it removing a someone stuck in a burning car after an accident or removing people trapped inside a forest fire.  

If rescue personnel knew there were missing people during the fire, they should have done everything they could to save them. And no, that doesn't make America a nanny-state...

Also, give me a break--the "skill levels" of these guys doesn't matter. I highly doubt the average--or even very skilled--outdoors-persons has practical training on what to do during a forest fire.
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 12, 2016 9:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Part of the fire...a new path up to Redbox-Rincon via Browns Gulch southern ridge....thanks to glendoramtnroad.blogspot.com for the picture

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 12, 2016 11:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

SageUrsus wrote:

Also, give me a break--the "skill levels" of these guys doesn't matter. I highly doubt the average--or even very skilled--outdoors-persons has practical training on what to do during a forest fire.


Skill level doesn't matter?  That is an absurd statement.  Someone with the knowledge of the terrain and the climbing and bushwacking skills of individuals like say, Sean, Willie, and Dima would have a much better chance of extricating themselves from entrapment by fire than the average day hiker.
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 12, 2016 12:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Huff and Puff wrote:
SageUrsus wrote:

Also, give me a break--the "skill levels" of these guys doesn't matter. I highly doubt the average--or even very skilled--outdoors-persons has practical training on what to do during a forest fire.


Skill level doesn't matter?  That is an absurd statement.  Someone with the knowledge of the terrain and the climbing and bushwacking skills of individuals like say, Sean, Willie, and Dima would have a much better chance of extricating themselves from entrapment by fire than the average day hiker.


No, skill level doesn't matter when it comes down to deciding if they should be rescued or not.
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 12, 2016 12:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

SageUrsus wrote:
Huff and Puff wrote:
SageUrsus wrote:

Also, give me a break--the "skill levels" of these guys doesn't matter. I highly doubt the average--or even very skilled--outdoors-persons has practical training on what to do during a forest fire.


Skill level doesn't matter?  That is an absurd statement.  Someone with the knowledge of the terrain and the climbing and bushwacking skills of individuals like say, Sean, Willie, and Dima would have a much better chance of extricating themselves from entrapment by fire than the average day hiker.


No, skill level doesn't matter when it comes down to deciding if they should be rescued or not.


O.K.  Whatever.
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 15, 2016 7:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Huff and Puff wrote:
Someone with the knowledge of the terrain and the climbing and bushwacking skills of individuals like say, Sean, Willie, and Dima would have a much better chance of extricating themselves from entrapment by fire than the average day hiker.


Willie and I were just discussing this topic last week when we drove up the canyon to do Burrito Peak. Knowledge and skill can only help you so much. Sometimes the forces of nature will overwhelm you. And that's a risk we all take when venturing so far from civilization and emergency services.

I do try to mitigate the risk of heat and fire related problems by focusing more on higher elevations during summertime. But, sometimes I wanna hit the foothills in the mornings or evenings. If I'm ever caught in the path of a raging wildfire, my first reaction would be to send an emergency text if possible. Then try to gauge the force and direction of the wind if any. And the speed and direction of the fire. Basically I would run away from the fire and against the wind if possible, aiming for the closest trailhead. If the wind is blowing the fire right at me, then I'm basically screwed. Desperate measures might include finding a relatively open area and hastily clearing the perimeter of as much brush as possible. Still I might catch fire from flying embers or suffocate. I guess I could remove my clothes or dig a little trench. Use drinking water to drench my hair. Cover my face with a bandana. I might even set the brush afire heading upwind in order to clear a larger "safe zone." But that's a huge risk since I can't control such a burn. If I can't outmaneuver or outrun the fire, then my only hope is to survive the tsunami of flames. And, frankly, there is not much hope in doing that. There is a reason why even firefighters don't rush into the heart of wildfires to save people. It's almost certain death. Those two who died were extremely unlucky and probably had no chance.
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 15, 2016 10:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Huff and Puff wrote:
Skill level doesn't matter?  That is an absurd statement.  Someone with the knowledge of the terrain and the climbing and bushwacking skills of individuals like say, Sean, Willie, and Dima would have a much better chance of extricating themselves from entrapment by fire than the average day hiker.


An upslope fire will move faster than any human can travel on foot. Unless you're within rock-throwing distance of safety the only hope you have in that situation is to set a back fire and get yourself into the middle of the burned out area by the time the main fire arrives.
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 10, 2016 4:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Some photos of Fish Canyon were released via Fish canyon facebook(https://www.facebook.com/FishCanyon/)..."...the photo below indicates that the survey party made it all the way to the falls. They report that it was a grueling and dangerous endeavor...."



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PostPosted: Fri Aug 12, 2016 10:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm really hoping that the Chinese Tree of Heaven forest about 1 mile in was wiped out by the fire. I was readying plans to deal with that infestation. As long as we can get back in there within a year it will be relatively easy to kill new Tree of Heaven growth.
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 12, 2016 4:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

SGBob wrote:
I'm really hoping that the Chinese Tree of Heaven forest about 1 mile in was wiped out by the fire. I was readying plans to deal with that infestation. As long as we can get back in there within a year it will be relatively easy to kill new Tree of Heaven growth.


That would be awesome...if it can be rewilded somewhat. But if the land-grabbers have development plans for their park, I wouldnt be surprised in the least.
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 15, 2016 10:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Closure order:
http://www.fs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/fseprd517826.pdf



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