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Official "People falling in Eaton Canyon" thread
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cougarmagic
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Location: Now I have a quote under my name, Taco.

PostPosted: Sat Jul 07, 2012 7:35 pm    Post subject: Official "People falling in Eaton Canyon" thread  Reply with quote

May as well start this now.

http://lacanadaflintridge.patch.c...ed-man-airlifted-from-first-falls

Quote:
Rescue personnel have just airlifted a man who allegedly fell and hit his head near the First Falls area of Eaton Canyon.

The rescue operation began sometime after 12:30 p.m., according to authorities at the Crescenta Valley Sheriff's Station. How the man injured his head was not immediately known.

According to scanner reports, the hiker may have been with other people at the time of the injury, officials stated there was a group of people near the victim. Fire fighters hiked in and reached the patient to evaluate his injuries.

By about 1:20 p.m., a rescue helicopter arrived to lift the patient out.

By 1:45 p.m. the patient was successfully transported to Huntington Memorial Hospital, according to deputies on scene.

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Location: Now I have a quote under my name, Taco.

PostPosted: Sat Jul 14, 2012 2:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

And the weekend is just getting started.

http://monrovia.patch.com/article...aton-canyon-night-rescue-4a9be559

Quote:
It took seven hours for Sierra Madre Search and Rescue and the Altadena Mountain Rescue Team to get out a hiker who got himself stuck down in a canyon while climbing up above Eaton Canyon


http://lacanadaflintridge.patch.c...irlifted-from-eaton-canyon-friday

Code:
A man with head and shoulder injuries was airlfited from the falls at Eaton Canyon on Friday afternoon, according to spokeswoman Lisa Derderian of the Pasadena Fire Department.

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Location: Now I have a quote under my name, Taco.

PostPosted: Tue Jul 17, 2012 7:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Off topic as far as location, but it's the same idea:

07/15/2012 16:16 ANF-3658 Jumped Off Cliff Missed Water Medical Aid Chantry Flats/Hermit Falls


Rolling Eyes
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 17, 2012 2:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ouch.   Shocked

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 17, 2012 8:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cougarmagic wrote:
Off topic as far as location, but it's the same idea:

07/15/2012 16:16 ANF-3658 Jumped Off Cliff Missed Water Medical Aid Chantry Flats/Hermit Falls


Rolling Eyes


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ciyM8de6qXU

"Had a bad landing straight on my butt[*tilted back towards rocks during jump*] and ended up going to the ER after for severe back strain and a possible hairline fracture in my tailbone"
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 18, 2012 8:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey, better watch your a$$ out there.   Wink

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Location: Now I have a quote under my name, Taco.

PostPosted: Sun Jul 22, 2012 6:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

"Sheriff's helicopter makes three forest rescues in one hour"

http://www.sgvtribune.com/news/ci...kes-three-forest-rescues-one-hour

Quote:
The first rescue call came in about 1 p.m. July 13, when authorities received word that a Pasadena man had taken a fall and tumbled about 80 feet down Eaton Canyon, in the forest north of Altadena, according to Los Angeles County sheriff's Sgt. Phil Barth.

"He suffered moderate trauma injuries and was treated by Sheriff's Emergency Services Detail paramedics and hoisted up into the aircraft," Barth said.

As soon as the injured hiker was safely in the aircraft, the helicopter crew noticed another man who was "precariously perched" on a sheer cliff face about 150 feet above the canyon floor, the sergeant said.

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 23, 2012 1:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The guys who fell are both lucky to be alive.  

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Location: Now I have a quote under my name, Taco.

PostPosted: Sat Aug 04, 2012 7:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.sgvtribune.com/news/ci...-falls-100-feet-down-eaton-canyon

Quote:
Pasadena firefighters rescued a man who fell 100 feet in Eaton Canyon Friday.

The rescue call came in at 11:44 a.m.

Lisa Derderian, spokeswoman for Pasadena Fire Department, said firefighters immediately hiked into the canyon to find the man.

She said the man suffered severe injuries to the chest, hip, femur and head.

A Los Angeles County Fire Department helicopter lowered two rescuers to where the injured man was. He was hoisted into the helicopter and taken to a local hospital, according to Derderian.


http://altadena.patch.com/article...hiker-airlifted-to-local-hospital

Quote:
Injuries appear to be compound fractures to the hip

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 06, 2012 2:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cougarmagic wrote:
severe injuries to the chest, hip, femur and head
Oh, wow.

So, do people no longer have a fear of heights?  Or are these all "immortal" teenagers?

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Location: Now I have a quote under my name, Taco.

PostPosted: Thu Aug 09, 2012 7:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/l...canyon-person-dies-waterfall.html

Quote:
A search-and-rescue team was scouring rugged terrain in Eaton Canyon on Wednesday night for two missing hikers, hours after a person died in a fall from a waterfall in the picturesque recreational area.


http://lacanadaflintridge.patch.c...rst-water-fall-wednesday-fde7c296

Quote:
The hiker climbed up to the upper water while and his family waited for him below.

He fell right in the same area as one of the other two fatalities that happened last summer at Eaton Canyon, Deleon said.

The area is a common one for falling hikers, Deleon added, and though the man fell around 150 feet, many others who have done so have survived.

In fact, according to Deleon, another hiker fell earlier on Wednesday from approximately the same area and Deleon and other rescuers ran into him walking away from the scene. Though injured and taken to the hospital, he survived.

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 09, 2012 8:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

cougarmagic wrote:
He fell right in the same area as one of the other two fatalities.
Son of a gun.  I don't like the idea of mandatory restrictions, but maybe a sign *is* warranted.  Don't like signs either, and of course a sign would probably grafittied over within the first week.  Dang, though, it's hard to see fatality after fatality.

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 09, 2012 11:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Signs?

This sign is located at both the top and bottom of the "horse trail" (Walnut Cyn.)...


This sign is closer to the bridge at the mouth of the canyon...


Stupid does hurt...eventually.
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 09, 2012 12:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Maybe a sign like the first one closer to the falls?

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 09, 2012 6:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hikin_Jim wrote:
cougarmagic wrote:
severe injuries to the chest, hip, femur and head
Oh, wow.

So, do people no longer have a fear of heights?  Or are these all "immortal" teenagers?

HJ


Nope, just a loss of common sense.   And no, there's no I-Phone app to make a common-sense decision for you.

Weren't these types of accidents a common occurance a few years ago at San Antonio Falls?  Maybe the recession has caused folks to look for places closer to home to injure themselves.  Just a thought . . .
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 10, 2012 7:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

atomicoyote wrote:
Maybe the recession has caused folks to look for places closer to home to injure themselves.  Just a thought . . .
Yes, I'd like the discount head trauma please.  I used to go for the full service head trauma, but now with the recession and all...  Well, I'm sure you understand.

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Location: Now I have a quote under my name, Taco.

PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2012 7:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Broke both legs, and traumatic head injury.

http://losangeles.cbslocal.com/20...feet-from-eaton-canyon-waterfall/
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2012 2:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

who needs to go to Iraq and get blown up by an IED when you have Eaton canyon right in your backyard.
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2012 10:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Seems every time you turn on the TV news they are showing more Eaton Canyon rescues than drive-by shooting reports Razz

Seeing as I'm a giant chicken, trail words like 'razorback' lead me the other way, so going to Eaton Canyon's second falls was only going to happen this way, so to speak/see...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YoSqlrmHyDM

I know plenty of folks here can handle routes like this but does this youtube footage fairly represent the steepness that an 'average' hiker would encounter?  If so, not too many people should even think about this route, let alone take it... oh well.

These hikers seem to be scrambling along the trail rather quickly... despite what appears to be a trail where 'one slight mis-step and down down down you go'...   Shocked  Shocked  
Are they just young, bold, and/or familiar with the trail to move that fast ?

Any more/better videos or photos that show the sheerness of this trail/area? Confused





Like Jim, I'm not too opposed to putting a sign closer to/at the base of this 'trail' --- in the shape of a head stone or a replica of a search and rescue/hospital bill...  Razz
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 22, 2012 7:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

One more for 2012.  Not much detail:

http://photos.pasadenastarnews.co...-lift-helicopter-search-rescue/#6
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2013 2:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

My issue?

Any time there is an accident in nature the victim is automatically called a "hiker."

That's not fair to hikers.

Park Rangers call them "Tourons." Part tourist and part moron. That might be more appropriate in most of the Eaton Canyon accidents.
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2013 10:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

My Eaton curiosity continues so I went to google earth this time.

The turquoise line I drew - is that the infamous Razor Back ridge?  And is this where most falls occur?

On the same line, after the ? mark, what  route do the 'tourons' Laughing go from there to get to the second waterfall?  [Hopefully I've tagged the right spot for the 2nd waterfall.]

And for a final [stupid] question - do the tourons that reach the 2nd waterfall have to return on the same 'trail' the used to get there?

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Location: Now I have a quote under my name, Taco.

PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2013 11:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's the ridge, but where the word "Falls" is on your map, the route stops climbing the ridge and traverses the cliff before dropping down immediately above the first falls.  They fall along the traverse, or while trying to descend the very last part.

There are a couple sections of traverse that are basically vertical.  Though there are some hand and footholds, they're made of our lovely crumbly granite.  There  isn't anything solid to anchor a rope to.

I've never done it.  Climbed up there once out of curiosity, got to the traverse section, and turned back.  

Coming back down was harder than going up.  Certainly would much harder in wet flip flops, while drunk.
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2013 4:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cougarmagic wrote:
That's the ridge, but where the word "Falls" is on your map, the route stops climbing the ridge and traverses the cliff before dropping down immediately above the first falls.  They fall along the traverse, or while trying to descend the very last part.

There are a couple sections of traverse that are basically vertical.  Though there are some hand and footholds, they're made of our lovely crumbly granite.  There  isn't anything solid to anchor a rope to.

I've never done it.  Climbed up there once out of curiosity, got to the traverse section, and turned back.  

Coming back down was harder than going up.  Certainly would much harder in wet flip flops, while drunk.

I hear that it's really easy to get down from heights, in flip-flops while drunk.  You are probably being picky and insisting on getting down in one piece and being able to move afterwards.
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2013 6:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cougarmagic wrote:
There are a couple sections of traverse that are basically vertical.  Though there are some hand and footholds, they're made of our lovely crumbly granite.  There  isn't anything solid to anchor a rope to.


Thanks for the info cougarmagic...

So going down [or back up] from the Razor Back to to the top of the first falls is where most get themselves hurt... well, now that you say that, combined with the various utubes of that particular portion of the 'hike', i can see how bad things happen [to incredibly stupid people]

Did I mention incredibly stupid people...

How in the hell did these folks survive?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a6UNsdMZwjY

btw, i tried to post this as an embedded youtube but failed - any tips on how to do that?
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Location: Now I have a quote under my name, Taco.

PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2013 9:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

outwhere wrote:

How in the hell did these folks survive?


Yup, that's where I turned around!  That goes for a good 10 feet or so, until it CLIMBS a crumbled gully where you grab roots to haul yourself up.  It's 150' down to the canyon bottom.  Not done there, it apparently then goes to the steep gully with a few rotted hardware store ropes tied to dead tree roots, where you lower yourself to the canyon bottom.  Once down you can spray paint rocks and jump off a 40' cliff into a 6' deep pool, so you can see the obvious attraction.

To embed video, click on "Share" then "Embed", then the trick is to check the box for "Use old embed code".  Just copy and paste that.
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 08, 2013 9:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cougarmagic, you're on a roll...

So good/funny, it had to be bulleted  Smile

cougarmagic wrote:


* a crumbled gully where you grab
   roots to haul yourself up.  

* goes to the steep gully with a few
   rotted hardware store ropes tied to
   dead tree roots,

* spray paint rocks and jump off a 40'
   cliff into a 6' deep pool,

so you can see the obvious attraction.


A big thanks for the youtube directions too, Cougar !!  I woulda never figured that out without your directions... and look what you get as a result Razz ---- video of 'a crumbled gully' and 'rotted hardware store ropes tied to dead tree roots'  Laughing

cougarmagic wrote:
To embed video, click on "Share" then "Embed", then the trick is to check the box for "Use old embed code".  Just copy and paste that.


Ummm, I really don't know, so this is a serious question, but it looks like this guy is climbing that rope without gloves - are/aren't gloves important ?  

Cougar, did you say something about 'obvious attraction' or 'oblivious ascenders'... ?  

Barring [forcing] helicopters and rescue teams to possibly pluck you out of this spot, 'to each their own'...

Shall we call this video 'Trying Not To Die' ?



Arrow  Arrow  Arrow

Bonus Boneheads Photo ... Screen captured from one of several Eaton Canyon rescue videos...  

Shocked  Question
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 20, 2013 12:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rescuers find lost hiker in Eaton Canyon
http://www.sgvtribune.com/news/ci...uers-find-lost-hiker-eaton-canyon
Quote:
ALTADENA - The Altadena Mountain Rescue team found a 14-year-old boy who got stranded Monday in Eaton Canyon, officials said.

Sgt. Paul Gallo of the sheriff's Crescenta Valley Station said the teen wasn't injured.

The California Highway Patrol received a 9-1-1 call around 6 p.m. from a woman who became separated from her son while hiking at Eaton Canyon past the first waterfall, according to Gallo.

"She was unable to find her son," he added.

The search and rescue team located the boy and walked him out. Gallo said the team got the teen to the roadside at about 10 p.m.

- Ruby Gonzales
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 25, 2013 2:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have always loved falling.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/24...emotional-plunge-modern-love.html

Quote:
Modern Love

Celebrating the Upside of an Emotional Plunge

By NATALIE LINDEMAN

Published: February 21, 2013

Last summer I fell 100 feet into one of the steepest canyons in the United States. After tumbling 75 feet down the near-vertical canyonside, I dropped another 25 feet in free-fall, landing in a dry stream bed between granite boulders.

People said my survival was a miracle. Fallen hikers are airlifted out of Eaton Canyon in Altadena, Calif., the site of my fall, on a regular basis. Every year several die.

I have always loved falling. When I was 3 my favorite game was mantel jumping. My dad would place me on the mantel, steady me and step back. I’d push off and fall for that perfect rush of a second before he caught me, swinging me to the ground.

In high school I found a teenage version of mantel jumping by leaping off high rocky cliffs with my friends into the ocean below. I loved the way the wind whistled in my ears, making me feel so alive.

Yet if I was passionate about adventure, I was cautious about passion. As my friends fell in and out of love, I comforted them, their faces flush with grief. Until one day I, too, took the leap and told the confident captain of the football team that I liked him, and he said he liked me. A week later he sent me an e-mail saying he was dating a girl he had met at camp, and that she was a lot like me, except blond.

I used this experience as an excuse not to get invested in any more boys. After my first kiss with one boy, I ignored his texts until he stopped trying. I told three more who asked me on dates that they were great friends. And I stopped texting another when he brought up homecoming.

I wasn’t looking for a boyfriend. I was looking for adventure. A boyfriend would only slow me down.

Then near the end of my junior year of high school, a senior named Wilder asked me to prom and I said yes. Maybe it was because I knew he would be leaving for college soon. Right after I said yes, though, my heart started pounding and I raced into an empty classroom to breathe for a minute alone. The smile on my face was so big it hurt.

Prom was a group event, not really a date, but he was still there, this boy, looking at me as no one ever had.

“Be casual,” I told myself sternly. Just because Wilder had kissed me on a lookout while the city lights blinked in the distance didn’t mean he wasn’t still leaving in three months. I was determined to keep things casual as we headed out on our first real date.

To escape the early summer heat we decided to hike the sage-lined trail to the waterfall in Eaton Canyon. Dozens of hikers were already splashing in the pool when a college-age hiker asked if we had heard of the second waterfall only a mile beyond.

“You want to go?” I asked Wilder, already half-standing. Although the path is unmarked, we tramped another 20 minutes up the steep incline and found it, beautiful and isolated.

In my head I kept shouting “Casual!” But it was difficult to hear myself over the water crashing around us as we kissed in the spray. It didn’t seem real, how perfectly I fit into his arms as the sun warmed our dripping skin.

If we had paid more attention going back, we might have realized we had turned down the mountain too soon, but just being around each other was making us high. It was so easy to be with him. The way he didn’t go too slowly, trusting I could keep up, and the way he laughed when I told him about the day Amy caught him staring at me in history, and he admitted it wasn’t the only time. “I’m in such trouble,” I thought.

We were coming around a curve in the canyon wall, hurrying to get back while it was still light. It was more like rock-climbing than we planned for, and we had to go flat against the wall and move carefully along a narrow ledge, but we figured it would get easier around the bend.

Wilder went first, searching for notches and footholds, finally making it around. Then I went, feeling for handholds, my face inches from the rock. I traced to where he had grasped, reaching back with my left foot, searching for the ledge. And suddenly I wasn’t holding on to anything. Sandy grit was skittering down the mountain alongside me. I was falling.

I thought I would be O.K., but when I saw the panic in Wilder’s eyes, I realized there would be no outstretched arms this time, no ocean waves. I knew how to fall, but not like this.

I woke up to the sound of helicopter blades. Someone had covered me with a shirt. I was warm, comfortable, so tired. A man in a jumpsuit lifted me, wrapped me in a tarp and clicked me into place. A cable carried me into the air. It struck me: I had just fallen and now they were taking me up even higher.

My dad found me in the too-bright emergency room and tried to hold my hands, but they were a bloody mess, like the rest of me. “Wilder is in the waiting room,” he said.

Nurses cut away my clothes with giant scissors and wiped the dirt and blood from my body. I heard scattered phases: “100 feet,” “fractured vertebrae,” “a miracle.”

They asked me to push against someone’s palm with my heel. I didn’t understand why everyone was amazed to see me move my fingers and toes. Finally they rolled me to a bed, put oxygen under my nose and stuck a needle in my arm. I fell asleep.

Wilder visited as soon as he was allowed, but I was too out of it to say anything except, “Thanks for the flowers.” I was on heavy pain medication, time passing in a blur of visitors and drugged sleep.

When he came the next day, though, I was ready. “You’re off the hook,” I said.

He sat next to me on the bed, my IV dripping behind his shoulder. “What do you mean?” he asked.

I explained, in my drugged speech, that he didn’t have to come to the hospital or hang out with a broken girl all summer. No guilt. I’d call him when I was healed and back to normal.

He stayed with me until a nurse kicked him out.

Five days later I was home. Doctors said I would have to wear a corset-like brace from my hips to my neck for 8 to 12 weeks, and then we could talk about recuperation. A week earlier I was the girl who leapt off cliffs into the ocean and jumped at the chance to find the second waterfall. Now, sitting up for 20 minutes exhausted me, and I could barely move without wincing in pain.

My family rushed around in a state of semi-panic. Everyone wanted to know if I needed another pillow, something to eat and when I’d taken my last painkiller. I hated being weak.

Wilder kept visiting, and it scared the hell out of me. I couldn’t stay awake for more than three hours, needed help with the simplest movements and smelled like blood. But when he came, I fought to look like the girl he had asked to prom. I’d brush out my hair, still full of canyon dust, wear a long skirt to cover my battered legs and make sure bandages covered my wounds.

I looked as if I had been mauled by a tiger, but the brace covered most of it. I’d laugh, roll out of bed and walk around, as if keeping in constant motion would prove I was strong, independent and unhurt.

But after a few hours my eyelids would droop and my back would beg for relief. I figured he’d leave while I slept, but I’d doze off listening to him playing basketball with my little brother, and when I’d wake up he’d be eating dinner with my family.

Sometimes I think my body saved itself that day by learning to surrender, that those years of falling prepared me to relax into the 100-foot plunge. But it was weeks after the fall before I could truly let go.

I thought I could use my injuries as an excuse to push Wilder away. I thought I could keep things casual. I thought I could forget the look on his face as I fell and ignore the terrifying feeling of longing in my chest. But I couldn’t.

Maybe it was the way he said, “I’d rather spend my summer with you than any other girl.” Maybe it was how being around him made me forget the brace and the wounds, made me feel whole and unbroken.

Finally, surrender became not just inevitable but exhilarating. I didn’t want to hold on to anything anymore. I wanted to fall, and I already had. And I knew that this time, too, I would be O.K.

Natalie Lindeman is a 17-year-old senior at The Waverly School in Pasadena, Calif.

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PostPosted: Thu Mar 14, 2013 12:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You know, when one of us gets hurt in Eaton proper... SAR will be so busy looking on that ridge they'll never find us. Sad
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 22, 2013 3:15 pm    Post subject: And the hits just keep on coming... Reply with quote

Just today.
One dead...one injured.
17 years old.
Like everyone else here I'm sure, I'm all about personal responsibility on the trail. But SOMETHING has to be done by the Forest Service to stop people who are over-confident and under-experienced from these types of tragedies.
More and bigger signs? A $1,000 fine for anyone caught heading to the falls? Fences?
Saddens me on one hand and pisses me off on the other.

http://www.kcet.org/living/travel...y/hiker-dies-at-eaton-canyon.html
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 22, 2013 3:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I can totally relate to your angry depression. Incidents  like this are totally avoidable which I believe makes it ever worse. If only these damn city slickers would know what it is they are getting themselves into instead of ignorantly injuring or killing themselves. You can't just go for a walk in the woods with your head in your arse; you have to be aware of the dangers that you are surrounded by. Another way of looking at events like this is it is just Darwinian evolution hard at work eliminating the dumb out of the species; it is still sad and completely avoidable though.
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 22, 2013 6:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It makes me sad that the people who pay for their lives are usually the ones 'talked into' going.  Ones who probably had reservations about it, but had someone telling them it would be OK.
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 30, 2013 5:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I assume another one up above the falls? Airlifted for a broken nose:

http://www.altadenablog.com/2013/...ning-after-breaking-her-nose.html
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 30, 2013 8:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

shreddy wrote:
I assume another one up above the falls? Airlifted for a broken nose:

http://www.altadenablog.com/2013/...ning-after-breaking-her-nose.html

Per NBC...
Quote:
On the day a girl who died in a hike in the San Gabriel mountains was remembered at a memorial service, two women had to be rescued after falling on the same trail.

Rescue crews worked on Saturday to rescue the women on the Eaton Canyon trail.

One woman in her 40s fell at the first waterfall at Eaton Canyon Park, said Lisa Derderian, a spokeswoman with the Pasadena Fire Department.

She had a minor nose injury and felt dizzy, so search and rescue crews called in a helicopter to hoist her out.

At same time, a call came in of a woman in her 20s who hurt her ankle closer to the Nature Center and parking lot.

She was taken to a hospital.

One was at the first waterfall. Assume what you want - whether she wasn't or was trying to get to the second falls.

Another was near the parking lot. No dangerous ridges there.
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 05, 2013 10:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sounds like maybe some canyoneers are missing in Eaton?

Story.
Quote:
Rescuers search for missing hikers in Eaton Canyon
By Brian Day Staff Writer
twitter.com/sgvcrimesgvtribune.com
Posted:   04/05/2013 09:32:54 AM PDT
April 5, 2013 4:34 PM GMTUpdated:   04/05/2013 09:33:51 AM PDT


ANGELES NATIONAL FOREST -- Search and rescue officials searched Eaton Canyon Friday in response to a report that five hikers who headed into the area for a day hike and rappelling trip Thursday morning never returned, authorities said.

Los Angeles County sheriff's officials received a call about 7 a.m. Friday from a man reporting that his daughter had gone to Eaton Canyon with four others about 8 a.m. Thursday, Sgt. Booker Hollis said. They never returned from what was planned to be an eight-hour outing.

The hikers were all believed to be in their mid-20s, the sergeant said.

Flights by search helicopters were limited due to fog in the area, he said. Rescuers on the ground were focusing their search in the area of the waterfalls in Eaton Canyon, where mishaps are common.


My highllights.
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 05, 2013 11:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

HikeUp wrote:
Sounds like maybe some canyoneers are missing in Eaton?


All found safe
http://www.nbclosangeles.com/news...Rescue-Hikers-Lost-201634251.html
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 05, 2013 11:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

AW wrote:
HikeUp wrote:
Sounds like maybe some canyoneers are missing in Eaton?


All found safe
http://www.nbclosangeles.com/news...Rescue-Hikers-Lost-201634251.html


It was a misunderstanding

http://www.sgvtribune.com/breakin...earch-missing-hikers-eaton-canyon
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 05, 2013 12:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Today on KPCC, on Larry Mantle's show, they discussed people falling in Eaton Canyon. Just general interest -- should there be a sign, should it be patrolled by officers, all that stuff. They also noted that they assume rescues cost money but I'm pretty sure that's not true.
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PostPosted: Sat May 04, 2013 2:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://zev.lacounty.gov/news/fatal-attraction-at-the-falls

I'm gonna quote the whole article and bold some items just cause I feel like it...
Quote:
Fatal attraction at the falls

May 2, 2013

It was late in the day when several twentysomething hikers happened upon veteran Los Angeles County rescuer Richard De Leon. Next to him was another young man, whose broken body had just been retrieved from the rocky floor of Eaton Canyon.

“Where you coming from?” De Leon asked the group, knowing all too well the answer.

“The second falls,” they confirmed. “But we’re fine.”

De Leon motioned to the man now being photographed by coroner’s officials. “So was he about an hour ago.”  

The hikers assured De Leon they weren’t like that guy.  “We know what we’re doing,” they insisted.

“So did he,” the rescuer said, hoping to drive home his point but knowing that he might as well have been lecturing the rocks.

Every day in the mountains above Pasadena, this sense of youthful invincibility collides with a stretch of treacherous terrain that leads to a waterfall tucked into Eaton Canyon. Unlike an easy hike that starts at the county-operated nature center and ends at a lower waterfall, there’s no trail to speak of to reach the upper falls—just an obstacle course of crumbling rock, tree limbs and narrow ridgeline paths with sheer cliffs on both sides.

In just the past two years, five people have fallen to their deaths there, the most at any single site in the county’s sprawling recreational landscape. The most recent, in March, was a 17-year-old Alhambra girl, who was a standout in academics and athletics. Already accepted to Cornell and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, high school senior Esther Suen sustained fatal head injuries after she plunged 200 feet. A teenage companion also fell, but he survived.

Although the problem is not new, De Leon, who is team captain of the Sheriff’s Department’s search and rescue team in Altadena, says the frequency of people being stranded and injured is on the rise because of social media postings that draw inexperienced hikers to the place and the destruction of other Angeles National Forest trails from the massive Station Fire a few years back.

“By the second or third rescue of the day,” De Leon says, he gets frustrated with the risk takers. “I start thinking, ‘Will you people just stop!’ ”

How to get them to do that, however, has turned into a test of competing strategies and wills among the government agencies that share responsibility for the area, including L.A. County and the U.S. Forest Service, which is responsible for the wilderness land that hikers use to reach the second waterfall.

In 2011, a series of multi-jurisdictional meetings were convened that included representatives from Supervisor Michael D. Antonovich’s office, the county’s parks and sheriff’s departments and the Pasadena fire department. From that effort came an online public service announcement featuring four uniformed sheriff and fire officials, who stressed that getting to the second waterfall “isn’t worth losing your life.”

But many at the table had wanted more. Some in the law enforcement contingent wanted to start charging reckless hikers for the substantial costs of rescues. Others suggested fencing off access points. At a minimum, though, most everyone agreed that the forest service should post a strongly worded warning sign where hikers, who’d easily reached the first waterfall, begin the mile-long trek to the second one. That is, most everyone except the forest service.

Ranger Mike McIntyre, who oversees the area, told the group that forest service lawyers wanted no warning signs placed on the agency’s land, in a spot where there’s not even a trail. Doing so, he said, could open the forest service to legal liability; attorneys representing injured hikers might argue that, if agency officials knew there was a risk of injury, then they had an obligation to make the area safer.

Now, in the wake of Suen’s death, the group is headed back to the table, this time with an even greater urgency to push the forest service to act, especially with the busy summer season approaching—or, as the Los Angeles Daily News put it in a recent editorial calling for better signage and more patrols at Eaton, the “dying season.”

Said Sussy Nemer, a senior deputy to Antonovich, whose district includes Eaton Canyon: “We’d like to see all the county agencies and the City of Pasadena work with the forest service to increase the signage near the second waterfall and put in place some kind of physical barrier to prevent hikers from even getting up there.”

Nemer said her office also hopes to recruit the area’s new state and federal elected representatives, “who could serve as allies in our cause.”

Russ Guiney, the director of the Los Angeles County’s Department of Parks and Recreation, said he’s under no illusion that more warning signs or even a fence would end the risky adventurism that’s luring the mostly younger crowds to dangerous heights. But like the county’s warnings signs in the lower canyon, he said, it might stop some in their tracks, which would represent a significant contribution to life and limb.

“I think if I was the forest service, I would want to do more,” Guiney said. “I’d think we had a moral obligation. Certainly, we in the county feel that we have a moral obligation….What people deserve and expect is a fair warning.”  

Guiney also said that his office would continue to monitor—and counter—such social media sites as YouTube and Yelp, where people have romanticized the second waterfall and downplayed the dangers.

Forest service ranger McIntyre said in an interview that, at the moment, he doesn’t foresee a shift in strategy from his agency. “We’re doing what our lawyers are telling us to do,” he said.

People mistakenly come to Eaton Canyon thinking it’s an urban park, along the lines of Griffith Park, he said. “But the forest is a wildlands area,” he said. “I’m not saying the forest is dangerous but it comes with inherent risks. We need to make people better prepared, and they need to know their limits.”

Michael Leum, who oversees all of the Sheriff’s Department’s search and rescue teams, says to count him among those who’d like to see the forest service take a more active role in Eaton’s safety issues and not treat them “like Kryptonite.” Since the forest service says it has no trails beyond the first waterfall, Leum said, “they believe there is no need for maintenance or signage, regardless of the fact that hundreds of people go up there.”

Leum said that if he had his way, he’d want the agency to “install safe ingress and egress into the area.”

The status quo, he said, only guarantees this: “People are going to get hurt and killed in that canyon.”


I think this is "the county's warning sign" mentioned in the article...

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PostPosted: Sun May 05, 2013 9:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hermit Falls has been seeing some action too lately:


HJ
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PostPosted: Sun May 12, 2013 8:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am fascinated by this "death hike" so I thought I would share the research I did on it today.

First, I could not find a GPS track of the "razorback trail" that leads to the second waterfall.  I started with a track to the first waterfall, then used Google Earth to zoom in on the area and find the trail, which I have highlighted in blue.  I added comments to it based on watching many youtube videos of people making the climb.



This a short hike, less than a mile off the normal trail, but is very dangerous.  It starts with what looks like class 3 climbing up the ridge, not so bad.  Then, it veers right before the top and goes along a cliff with severe exposure.  It looks like there is one class 4 move around a rock, but you are exposed to 100' drops into the canyon along the entire cliff section.  At the end is a steep drop off where most people use a rope placed by someone else tied to a tree.

I looked carefully on Google Earth for a better way down by continuing up the ridge, then coming down from higher up the canyon.  However, there did not appear to be any safer or less steep drops into the canyon from this approach.

I think it would be better to treat this as a mountaineering or canyoneering adventure as documented here:

http://www.maximumadventure.net/2...neering-eaton-canyons-waterfalls/

I do think I could make the climb on razorback ridge, but I don't think it is worth the risk.  If I was going to do it, I think I would look for a safer way.  I have no idea if people return the same way or come down the canyon to get out.  I could not find that documented anywhere.

I also think it is ridiculous to see amateurs jumping 50ft from the cliff into the second waterfall pool.  Maybe I was that foolish in my 20s.  I like to think I wasn't.  No wonder so many people get hurt attempting this without preparation.
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PostPosted: Mon May 13, 2013 4:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Interesting info; thanks for posting it.  I've never been interested in pursuing the route.  There's just something about "falling to one's death" that persuades me to hike elsewhere.

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PostPosted: Mon May 13, 2013 5:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hikin_Jim wrote:
Interesting info; thanks for posting it.  I've never been interested in pursuing the route.  There's just something about "falling to one's death" that persuades me to hike elsewhere.

HJ



I hear ya. The death part is a big turn off.  Maybe it is social media that gets kids out there and over their heads.  The sheer number of rescues and injuries merits attention.  I think the forest service is doing what it it thinks is best.

They made a PSA and requested that the Modern Hiker blog remove references to the route and add severe warnings.  They may have reached out to other blogs as well.
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PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2013 1:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've done it a bunch of times. It's loose, and steep on both sides for a while. Not worth looking at. Would be nice if it was destroyed.
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PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2013 4:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I read this post at Modern Hiker. I'm not very familiar with Casey Schreiner's blog, so I might be missing something of his opinion and context. But he seems to be blaming the concept of "urban wilderness" for such problems as those seen in Eaton Canyon.

Quote:
The phrase being used in the media to describe this latest threat to our safety and existence is “Urban Wilderness.” Because these canyons are usually only a few minutes away from a 7-11 or In-n-Out, they say, to inexperienced hikers they seem to be safe and controlled environments and not the untamed wilds. Those who don’t have much wilderness experience may expect the trails to be some sort of outdoor Disney Land – maintained, free from every danger except sunburns, and constantly patrolled by well-paid rangers in sparkling uniforms. They then come out onto the trails without the proper gear or preparation, take risks they shouldn’t, and quickly get themselves in over their heads.


He then continues with some possible ways to combat this concept.

Frankly, I don't see the wisdom in this view. It assumes that some inexperienced hikers are so idiotic that they cannot see with their own eyes that they are engaging in risky behavior. And apparently such people have achieved such stupidity simply because the wilderness exists too closely to the city. This notion doesn't make sense to me.

First of all, I don't subscribe to such a negative view of humanity. Sure, a few people are total morons when it comes to hiking. But it's not because of "urban wilderness." It takes years and years of poor schooling and parenting to raise such monumental idiots. And you're not going to cure these sorts of their recklessness by blaming something other than them for their own dumb behavior.

Second, I'm positive that most Razorback Trail hikers in Eaton Canyon know very well that they are risking injury or death, and that is part of the thrill for them. They aren't morons. Maybe they are thrill-seekers who value their lives a little less than they should. But that, of course, is for them to decide.

Third, let's maintain some context here. According to the Modern Hiker post, five people have died in Eaton Canyon within the last two years. That doesn't seem like a lot to me, considering how many people take the Razorback Trail every week. Yes, it's tragic when some teenager dies up there. But do we really think an oxymoron like "urban wilderness" can explain it?
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PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2013 5:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sean wrote:

Frankly, I don't see the wisdom in this view. It assumes that some inexperienced hikers are so idiotic that they cannot see with their own eyes that they are engaging in risky behavior. And apparently such people have achieved such stupidity simply because the wilderness exists too closely to the city. This notion doesn't make sense to me.


From what Ive seen, its true, but not for the reasons Modern Hiker says. They do bring the 'urban' to the route, but the 'urban' they bring is their approach to the obstacles and the area. Thus recently someone thought they just made that slope traverse easier by installing bolts in crap rock Rolling Eyes If they just got rid of this stuff thats supposed to make it safer, it would be safer because very few would attempt it.

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PostPosted: Sun May 19, 2013 6:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

From what I see most of the people that have tragic endings here are inexperienced and young. The razorback starts off mildly difficult. by the time it gets dangerous, going back down does not look very easy either. I did this route once when I was 13 years old. I was tagging along with my older brother and his friends. I was 1/4 of a second from death. My grasp slipped, and I began a backwards fall. Remembering the rule they set out earlier, "If you are falling, don't take anyone with you". I just quietly knew I was dead. My brother happened to have a firm grasp of a small tree trunk, and saw me through the corner of his eye. He took his free hand and slammed me back to verticle
The Panic I felt as an complete inexperienced hiker, I knew I would not make it with and froze momentarily. If you have ever been in a position on a cliff where 100% pure panic of hanging on a death wall, you know you only have one option......focus on what you need to do, and you can worry about the fear later. Somehow I knew it was focus or death.
To this day 40 years later, whenever I hike, I always have enough room to fall, and have at least one chance of catching myself before it is a shear cliff.
I have had a strange desire lately to do that route for the second time in my life..........nawww.....fogetaboutit
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 13, 2013 12:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow I thought climbing above dawn mine to see the upper entrance was crazy..These people really deserve anything that happens to them.
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 15, 2013 2:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've done this hike too, like, 20 years ago. I won't want to ever do it again. Just not worth the risk, a second time. I agree it should be destroyed by ANF or something.
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